You can make a difference.

What you can do

1) Look for alternative materials or avoid excessive packaging when deciding on purchases. Use paper bags, milk and juice in cardboard, and cloth diapers. Insist on paper bags and glass bottles.

2) Recycle. Many communities currently offer pick-up recycling programs for #1 and #2 plastics. Other forms of plastic may be accepted by a local recycling business. If your community doesn't have a recycling program, contact your city or town hall to request one.

3) Educate others about the problem of marine debris, enhancing "voluntary compliance through awareness."

4) Get involved. Locate or start a coastal cleanup in your area.

 

Donate

Your donation allows us to connect people and create partnerships around the world. We run conservation projects with our partners, seeking the most constructive solutions.

 

Spread the Word

Tell your friends and family about these threatened places. There's no better way to make an impact than to become an active advocate yourself. Join now and make an impact!

 
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Plastic is a valuable resource in many ways,  but plastic pollution is an unnecessary and unsustainable waste of that resource.

  • Packaging is the largest end-use market segment accounting for just over 40% of total plastic usage.

  • Annually approximately 500 billion plastic bags are used worldwide. More than one million bags are used every minute.

  • A plastic bag has an average “working life” of 15 minutes.

  • Over the last ten years we have produced more plastic than during the whole of the last century.

Beverage Bottles Alone

  • According to the Container Recycling Institute, 100.7 billion plastic beverage bottles were sold in the U.S. in 2014, or 315 bottles per person.

  • 57% of those units were plastic water bottles: 57.3 billion sold in 2014. This is up from 3.8 billion plastic water bottles sold in 1996, the earliest year for available data.

  • The process of producing bottled water requires around 6 times as much water per bottle as there is in the container.

  • 14% of all litter comes from beverage containers. When caps and labels are considered, the number is higher.

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